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Bamboo Knit

  • The Sewing Workshop Stella Top in Pink Bamboo Knit

    Closeup of Bonnie in The Sewing Workshop Stella Top in Pink Bamboo Knit Closeup of Bonnie in The Sewing Workshop Stella Top in Pink Bamboo Knit

    Bonnie in The Sewing Workshop Stella Tunic in Pink Bamboo Knit Bonnie in The Sewing Workshop Stella Tunic in Pink Bamboo Knit

    Bonnie Staying Warm in The Sewing Workshop Stella Top in Pink Bamboo Knit Bonnie Staying Warm in The Sewing Workshop Stella Top in Pink Bamboo Knit

    Our wonderful seamstress, Bonnie Thompson, made The Sewing Workshop Stella Top in our pink bamboo knit. The fabric is a technical charcoal-bamboo and polyester blend that wicks moisture away from the body -- making it great for long underwear. But, it's also reversible and gorgeous, so Bonnie correctly thought it would work well for this top.

    The Sewing Workshop Stella Top Pattern Review:

    The Sewing Workshop Stella Top, available in our shop here, can be made out of knit or woven fabric. Bonnie's pink fabric is a two-way stretch,  so we think it's perfect for a pattern drafted for both knits and wovens. A four-way stretch fabric would likely lead to an overly large Stella Top.

    Bonnie lengthened the pattern to make it more of a tunic than a shirt, and she lengthened the sleeves. She warns that "wrist length" sleeves are shorter than long sleeves -- be sure to check the sleeve length before you cut out your fabric.

    Conclusion:

    Bonnie loves the pattern, and we love it on her! She especially liked the flat-felled seam and the neck cowl. She also created cuffs for the hems to showcase the wrong side of the pink bamboo knit fabric. Not much of the wrong side shows on the cowl.

    buy-the-fabric-stella buy-the-pattern-stella

  • Ivy #2

    I had so much fun making my first Sewing Workshop Ivy Top, I whipped up a second one. The Sewing Workshop patterns are perfect candidates for playing with fabric. They are all impeccably drafted, and they aren't overly fitted, so you don't need to fuss with tweaking the fit. With three different knits, the fabric combination options for this top are endless. 

    This top works great with a variety of knit weights. The black and gray stripe is a bamboo ponte, the pink is a mid-weight rayon knit, and the gray is a tissue-weight bamboo. Photo by Andrea Jones. This top works great with a variety of knit weights. The black and gray stripe is a bamboo ponte, the pink is a mid-weight rayon knit, and the gray is a tissue-weight bamboo. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    The back. The tissue-weight bamboo wrinkles in the wind!. Photo by Andrea Jones. The back. The tissue-weight bamboo wrinkles in the wind!. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    Close-up of the three fabrics. Photo by Andrea Jones. Close-up of the three fabrics. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    The left sleeve has a triangle insert at the elbow, adding even more interest to the top. Photo by Andrea Jones. The left sleeve has a triangle insert at the elbow, adding even more interest to the top. Photo by Andrea Jones.

  • Hello Ivy!

    One of the many highlights of my trip to Quilt Market in Seattle was seeing Linda Lee, owner of The Sewing Workshop, wearing her Ivy Tunic both days. She looked so chic and slim. I had to buy the pattern and make one (okay, two) as soon as I got home. This is version #1. 

    Front of Ivy Tunic. Photo by Andrea Jones. Front of Ivy Tunic. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    The Ivy can be made with three different knits, but this time I decided to use just two. Both fabrics are bamboo knits (purchased at Fabric Depot in Portland, Oregon). The black and gray stripe is a ponte-weight super stable fabric. The teal and gray stripe is much lighter weight. You can see that I struggled a bit to make it lie nicely at the bottom hem.

    Back of Ivy Tunic. Photo by Andrea Jones. Back of Ivy Tunic. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    I love this tunic. Like all Sewing Workshop patterns, I didn't need to make any alterations to the main bodice. I wish I had lengthened it for my six-feet-tall frame, though. It looked more like a dress on Linda. A friend at work made herself one, and felt it was too long....You may want to make a quick muslin to check the length on your frame...

    Closeup of the different sleeves. Photo by Andrea Jones. Closeup of the different sleeves. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    One sleeve has a cool inset at the bottom, and the other just has a contrasting cuff.

    Mitered corner (after a few washings). Photo by moi. Mitered corner (after a few washings). Photo by moi.

    One of Linda Lee's many specialties is the mitered corner. She has a great method that works every time, even on non-traditional angles and fabrics. She includes the instructions in all of her patterns, and demonstrates them in her Craftsy classes. I would never have tried a mitered corner in a thin, drapey knit like this bamboo without Linda's guidance. You can leave the bottom hems raw on this tunic, but nice miters were so tempting, I had to try them. I can't wait to dream up more fun fabric combos for my new friend Ivy!

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