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Jeans

  • Jalie Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Pattern Review

    Eleanore pull-on jeans Front View Eleanore pull-on jeans front view

    Bonnie made a cute pair of Jalie Eleanore Pull-On Jeans out of floral stretch denim -- available here.  They look cute on her, but she did make some major alterations. Here is her review of the pattern:

    Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

    Yep it did, after many adjustments.

    Were the instructions easy to follow?

    Yes, they were.

    What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

    I loved the style and the use of stretch denim. I didn’t like the lowness of the rise, or the single-layer yoke.

    Fabric used:

    Floral Stretch Denim from The Confident Stitch.

    Pattern Alterations or any design changes you made:

    After comparing the pattern to a pair of ready-made pull-on jeans I like, I made some changes based on the differences between the pattern and the ready-made jeans. My ready-made jeans had a much higher rise, so I raised the back rise by 3 inches, and the front rise by 1 inch.

    I also had trouble making the waist small enough, so I created a fake fly with 3 hooks, which allowed me to cinch in the waist and still get the pants over my hips.

    Would you sew the Eleanore Pull-On Jeans again? Would you recommend the jeans to others?

    Why, yes I will. I love my pants. I recommend this pattern to intermediate sewers who know how to alter patterns.

    Conclusion:

    The Eleanore Pull-On Jean is a great pattern for anyone who loves a low-rise. It is also a good pattern for anyone who wants a mid-rise and knows how to make the alteration.

     

    Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Side View Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Side View

    Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Back View Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Back View

    Eleanore pull-on jeans back pocket detail Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Back Pocket Detail

    Detail of the faux front pocket on the Eleanore Pull-On Jeans Eleanore pull-on jeans faux front pocket detail

    buy-the-fabric-eleonore-jeans buy-the-pattern-eleonore-jeans

     

  • Accidental Cool Jeans

    Looking powerful in my cool new jeans! Looking powerful in my cool new jeans!

    In case I haven't mentioned this before, I am extremely tall -- 6 feet tall to be exact -- and, most of my length is in my legs. I love to make pants that are long enough, but sometimes I don't add enough length to the pattern. The pants seem long enough until I yank the center back up a few inches to compensate for my flat derriere, and they turn out too short. Talk about a return to 7th-grade trauma!

    This is what happened with my beloved boot-cut jeans from a couple of years ago. Then I had an idea -- skinny jeans can be shorter than boot-cuts, right? I followed Jennifer Stern's advice on how to taper a pair of boot-cut jeans . I took out the hem in order to create the taper. I was planning to re-sew the hem after tapering, but when I saw the cool shibori look at the bottom of my well-worn jeans, I decided to leave them unhemmed. Now the jeans are longer, trendy AND tapered. Win-win-win for me!

    Shoes handmade in Missoula by Bean_an_ti. Shoes handmade in Missoula by Bean_an_ti.

  • Straight-Edge Jeans

    As you know, I'm a big fan of Jennifer Stern's pattern line. I wrote about my first pair of her Misses Jeans here.  I have made many versions of The Tee for myself. I have taught two classes using The Tee pattern, and my students love it. Now Jennifer has a jeans pattern for women whose hips are relatively straight, called J Jeans. The side of the pants is perfectly straight, making the pattern great for uber-cool Japanese selvedge denim. I have now made two pairs of J Jeans. Both out of Montauk Twill (which I will soon be selling on-line and in my store!). Robert Kaufman's Montauk Twill is beefy, but becomes very soft after one washing. 

    J Jeans side view. Photo by Andrea Jones. J Jeans side view. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    In case you don't know about Jennifer or her patterns, you can scroll through her blog here. She has classes on Pattern Review, and a brand-new jeans class on Craftsy (25 percent off during Memorial Day Weekend). In addition, she videos a Quick Tip every week on her blog, and a few months ago, she used my baggy-knee issue with these pants as her tip. You can see the knees bagging in the photo above. I had done a flat derriere adjustment using Fit for Real People, which helped a lot, but did not fix all the issues. I sent Jennifer a photo, and she posted her great video here.  Did I mention she is awesome?

    I made my first pair of these jeans at a quilt retreat without making any alterations to the pattern. I hoped they would be a wearable muslin, but no. I tweaked and tweaked, but I couldn't get them to fit well enough for public viewing. 

    Live a clean life, or you may find yourself here late at night -- in a public restroom with a quilter taking a picture of your butt in badly fitting pants!!!! Photo by a quilter who prefers to remain anonymous. Live a clean life, or you may find yourself here late at night -- in a public restroom with a quilter taking a picture of your butt in badly fitting pants!!!! Photo by a quilter who prefers to remain anonymous.

    I had fun with the top stitching. Photo by Andrea Jones. I had fun with the top stitching. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    Back to this basic blue version. I made a few alterations to the paper pattern. First, I lengthened the legs (but not enough!) Second, I did a Fit for Real People flat derriere adjustment, which for me involves folding out one inch of width in the  back. I made a long vertical fold all the way down the leg in the back, including the yoke. Third, I pinched half an inch of length out of the front by folding the tissue horizontally between the waistband and the crotch because the front of my first pair was quite roomy. Fourth, the shape of the back crotch was similar to mine, but I lowered it by about an inch (I turn 51 next week -- and all that wisdom comes with some southward migration).

    The back looks pretty good if you can't see the knee bagginess. There is no stretch in the fabric! Photo by Andrea Jones. The back looks pretty good if you can't see the knee bagginess. There is no stretch in the fabric! Photo by Andrea Jones.

    The front. My next pair will have a little more length, and a little less knee bagginess. Photo by Andrea Jones. The front. My next pair will have a little more length, and a little less knee bagginess. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    I do love this twill, so my next pair may be out of the same fabric in a different color, but I am tempted by the challenge of Japanese selvedge denim. I have some for the shop, and I'll need to be able to tell my patrons how to sew with it, right? 

  • $1,000 Jeans

    When I bought my Viking Designer I sewing machine ten years ago, the warranty card had a little survey on it. The survey asked, "Why did you buy this machine? Check all that apply." One of the check boxes was marked, "To save money on clothes." Hahahaha! I could buy a ton of clothes for the price of my new machine!

    The creative process of sewing my own clothes is priceless, however. I love choosing the perfect fabric, planning my project, buying the thread, listening to music in my sewing room while time flies. The sewing itself is soothing and satisfying, and the finished product makes me feel comfortable and proud. So, while the making of these jeans was an epic and expensive task, it was a wonderful process, and I will "save money on clothes" when I make my next pair. 

    These jeans started their life in Detroit, Michigan. Fred and I traveled to Detroit last fall -- I wanted to attend the American Sewing Expo, and Fred wanted to visit his step daughter and grand babies. At ASE, I took an all-day jeans fitting class with Jennifer Stern. I had watched Jennifer's Fit Your Tee to a Tee class at Patternreview.com, so I knew I enjoyed her calm, clear teaching style. 

    In Detroit, Jennifer had us all make test garments out of stiff denim muslin. Mine fit great. She had also lugged a giant roll of denim from the garment district of NYC to her home in Connecticut, and she had driven it to Detroit for the Expo. I bought 6 yards and flew them back to Montana, where they sat for months.  

    In June of this year, my daughter graduated from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut -- Just 20 minutes from Jennifer Stern's house! I used my test garment to cut out the denim from NYC, and packed it in my suitcase for another trip across the country. Jennifer and I spent an entire day together perfecting the fit and sewing up the jeans. We had a great time, and I learned a ton.

    I repacked my partially finished masterpiece and flew it across the country again. When I got home, I quickly finished the jeans with oh-so-satisfying topstitching. I bought some rivets from Taylor Tailer. Now I have just one more purchase -- a rivet press -- and my jeans will be perfect. Here they are, sans rivets and buttons!

    The front. Photo by Andrea Jones The front. Photo by Andrea Jones

    The side. Photo by Andrea Jones. The side. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    And a close-up of the back. Yes, I used two different top stitching colors. Photo by Andrea Jones. And a close-up of the back. Yes, I used two different top stitching colors. Photo by Andrea Jones.

    Close-up of the front! Photo by Andrea Jones. Close-up of the front! Photo by Andrea Jones.

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