The Grainline Yates Coat in Double-Faced Wool

 

For us in Montana—and much of the country—winter just. Won’t. End! You may be sick of it (or sick of hearing about it), so I’ll spare you the freezing white details. But the good news is we felt like a blog post about this gorgeous Grainline Yates Coat was still weather appropriate! 

The Yates Coat pattern was released just over a year ago. Jen, the founder of Grainline Patterns, thoughtfully designed this coat to be “elegant, yet easy to wear.” Tackling an outerwear project can feel intimidating, but ultimately it’s so rewarding. Plus, wool is lovely to sew with (see our tips here) and will keep you toasty warm! Here are our thoughts on this pattern and finished garment.

A Classic Coat with Modern Details

The Yates Coat’s design is a nod to traditional tailoring. The collar, lapels, lining, and double-breasted closure are all features found in a classic wool coat. The modern spin on this coat comes from the clever in-seam pockets and the oversized lapels, plus its stylish length. The pattern also features a two-piece sleeve, which helps improve fit and durability. This is a good pattern for intermediate and advanced sewists who have never tried outerwear before. As usual, the instructions were clear and Jen features a helpful sewalong on her website.

Using the Double-Faced Wool

The Yates Coat calls for a thick fabric such as wool melton, boiled wool, or felted wool. Bonnie made hers out of this luxurious double-faced wool in camel and driftwood, which made for a cozy, gorgeous coat. She used an Aboriginal Quilting Cotton for the lining. (Any lightweight cotton or rayon would work great for a lining, as would these Bemberg fabrics!) The wool was a bit tricky to sew with. Because of its thickness, seam allowances became bulky, especially on the collar. When that happened it was essential to grade the seams. In some cases, Bonnie even separated the two layers of wool. When using a thicker fabric plus a cotton lining (as opposed to the rayon Bemberg, for example), it’s a good idea to check the finished measurements of the sleeves. Bonnie reduced the seam allowance slightly to ensure the sleeves were roomy and comfortable.

Overall? We give it two thumbs up! The pattern and the fabric seem to  be made for each other—and this endless winter. And now we have another great outerwear pattern in our arsenal!

  

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